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ANNOUNCEMENT: We are dedicated to your legal needs and available during this difficult time. In order to do our part to help stop the spread of COVID-19, we are offering virtual consultations for both new and existing clients upon request. Click HERE to contact us and request a video consultation.

You know the old adage: Don’t put off until tomorrow …

| Jul 12, 2021 | Estate Planning |

Is procrastination inherent in human nature?

Arguably, that is not the case, of course. Most people who recognize that they really should take action on a particular matter often do so in a timely way.

But not always. Legions of folks do in fact put off until tomorrow – or even to some almost remotely unforeseeable time in the future – a task or endeavor that would be far better attended to now.

Like saving money, for instance. Or following through on an upcoming responsibility that looms larger every day.

Or duly thinking about and subsequently executing an estate plan.

That last insertion might be a bit unexpected, but this is an estate planning and administration blog, after all. And it is truly the case that industry pundits and commentators routinely underscore the tendency of legions of would-be planners to procrastinate on planning.

Life often makes I’ll-do-it-later types pay for that, in both figurative and literal ways.

Many young couples with children forgo planning, with stories subsequently featuring that highlight the downsides of their failure to designate a preferred guardian. There are countless cases of heirs caught up in confusion and conflict because mom and dad never quite got around to discussing inheritances or putting things straight in a will. The special needs of select loved ones are never addressed or provided for when planners … don’t plan.

In fact, the broad-based utility of a timely and well-considered plan simply remains a could-have event for individuals and couples who never quite got around to executing a plan and communicating it to heirs, beneficiaries, loved ones and other affected parties.

Persons seeking information on the fundamental value conferred by timely and tailored planning can secure candid guidance and diligent representation from an experienced estate planning legal team.